Jamaican flag

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Jamaican flag
source: istockphoto.com

The Jamaican flag is a symbol of both freedom and unity. It has been proudly flown since August 6, 1962, as an indicator for what was to come in this new nation’s history – memories of past achievements that give us hope about where we can go next combined with inspiration from our rugged terrain.
A similar sentiment is found in the UK’s Union Jack, which has been proudly flown by the British Empire since around 1801 (when Great Britain was still the name for a particular British province). A proud tradition of British colonialism, it also serves as a reminder and symbol of what we are proud to be part of.

History of the Jamaican Flag

The Jamaican flag is a symbol of both freedom and unity. It has been proudly flown since August 6, 1962, as an indicator for what was to come in this new nation’s history – memories of past achievements that give us hope about where we can go next combined with inspiration from our rugged terrain.
The design of the Jamaican flag was inspired by a combination of its own geography, history, and culture. This simple flag was composed of a red background with the coat of arms in the center, which was designed to represent the country’s heritage. It consists of two equal horizontal bands: green on top and red on the bottom, each containing the coat of arms: a shield with a red rose (representing life) within it; and surrounding it, a blue background representing the sea. The words “Jamaica” are written in white in blue beneath the shield.
The first official flag on May 23rd, 1871 (the day that Britain recognized that Jamaica was independent of England) was identical to the one used today except for coloration; it had only three bands instead of four and only two tinctures instead of three (red-white-blue). The tinctures were changed later to reflect other local influences.

The Jamaican Flag as a symbol of Unity, Diversity, and Heritage

As I’m sure you know, the Jamaican flag is a symbol of both freedom and unity. It has been proudly flown since August 6, 1962, as an indicator of what was to come in this new nation’s history.
There are many different interpretations of our flag: some people say it was originally designed with a black background so that we could not be easily identified; others say that the black background was added later to make it more universal; still others claim that it represents the island’s identity as a “black nation.”
It is often said that the Jamaican flag is simply a blue version of (which we have called) the “Union Jack” – but it seems to me that this is somewhat misleading. The blue and white stripes represent Britain and Jamaica respectively; while the red and blue stripes represent our own identities as Jamaicans. We don’t think of ourselves as one people, or one nation, or even one Caribbean country. As I’ve said before, we are more than just Black people in Jamaica; we are Black people from all over the world who came here for a reason – mostly to escape slavery in our own land. Not only does this have implications for how our country is represented on flags, but also how its citizens are represented on paper.
We’ve gone so far as to officially use colors that don’t exist in other countries’ flags – at least not those recognized by Britain – because they represent our own heritage and identity. The colors may not be exactly the same as ours in other countries’ flags but they do represent something very real: something defined by us alone… something that will help us tell our story (and hopefully inspire others too).
The Flag of Jamaica
Stretching from sea to sky along Port Royal Bay, Port Royal, Kingston, Jamaica. In Algonquian: Bonaire (the first English settlement), Newfoundland; St John’s, Antigua; Barbados; Grenada; Saint Vincent & Grenadines. On January 1st, 1964, Queen Elizabeth II made Port Royal her official home. A statue of her stands at its foot. In honor of her visit, hundreds lined up day after day to get a glimpse of her statue and take photos with their mobile phones. The statue herself was installed in 1967 by Captain Thomas Cookson, which is now located adjacent to King Street in downtown Kingston. The statue was unveiled by Governor-General Sir Kenneth Clive on October 22nd, 2007 during celebrations marking 100

The Jamaican Flag as a Symbol of Hope and Pride

If you’re a new startup, you may be wondering if your startup is truly a new start. You may feel a sense of unease about the fact that your company was founded in 2013 and you’re still here – unsure if this is a “success” in the old world or not.
So, what kind of business model do you have? Are you selling services or products? Is your product different from the competition? How do you differentiate yourself from the pack? What are all those people talking about who have just launched their product and are calling it “the way to go”?
The answer to these questions is not much. You can try to craft an experience that will make your users feel different than everyone else out there. You can think about how people expect products to work — and try to build those expectations into your product. But after launch, unless you already have an established customer base, the only way to know for sure is through sales and support.
That doesn’t mean there isn’t room for experimentation with real innovation and experimentation with a culture that truly embraces change. That kind of culture (where gut instinct replaces long-standing tradition) is rare and exciting, but it also takes time, effort, and commitment to building.
And while some startups seem like they are growing quickly, most of them aren’t. Slow growth isn’t necessarily something that has anything bad with it (in fact, many high-growth startups eventually crash), it just means that there isn’t enough data available yet to really determine what worked or didn’t work well enough (or at all).

The Jamaican Flag as a symbol of Unity and Love

The Jamaican flag is a symbol of both freedom and unity. It has been proudly flown since August 6, 1962, as an indicator for what was to come in this new nation’s history – memories of past achievements that give us hope about where we can go next combined with inspiration from our rugged terrain.
The flag is ensigned with four yellow stars facing to the left and one star facing to the right. The flag’s shape is inherited from the design used in 1605 by Christopher Columbus, who named his home “La Punta del Puerto” (Port of Point). This shape, which had already been used in Europe by seafarers since the 15th century, was later adopted by Italian navigators and mariners as a general geographic tool.

Conclusion

The Jamaican flag is a symbol of both freedom and unity. It has been proudly flown since August 6, 1962, as an indicator for what was to come in this new nation’s history – memories of past achievements that give us hope about where we can go next combined with inspiration from our rugged terrain.
The flag was created in 1959 by Steve Marley, a frontman of reggae band The Wailers. The design was inspired by the Jolly Roger, a skull and crossbones used by pirates. Today the Jamaican flag is one of the most recognizable symbols in the world, including on everything from cell phone cases to T-shirts and part of national culture becoming more than just a nod to culture.

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