Things You Should Know About Treatment in Fort Lauderdale if Your Child is Thumb Sucking

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Things You Should Know About Treatment in Fort Lauderdale if Your Child is Thumb Sucking
source: burkeredfordorthodontists.com

A dental exam is essential for proper oral health and is the most effective technique to discover problems early on. Early detection and treatment save time, money, and misery. Visit a dentist in Fort Lauderdale to get your first dental examination. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that a child’s first visit to the dentist happens around the age of three unless any of these dental health risk factors occur.

-Using a cup or bottle to sleep

-Sucking the thumb

-Down Syndrome Teeth Staining

Let us talk about thumb sucking in detail:

As parents, we do everything possible to keep our children safe, comfortable, and happy. Distracting them with the TV or the iPad may be necessary at times. At other times, it involves allowing your child to continue sucking their thumb even after completing preschool.

If your child is between the ages of 6 and 8 and still sucking their thumb, you should encourage them to quit. This is the age when permanent teeth begin to emerge, and thumb sucking might cause difficulties with the way the mouth develops.

When your child sucks their thumb, pressure is applied to the front teeth, which pushes them forward and results in a malocclusion, or “buck teeth.” Other teeth may also emerge incorrectly, causing your child to have speech difficulties. Depending on how hard your youngster sucks their thumb, the roof of the mouth may also be affected. While some of these issues may resolve on their own after the thumb sucking ceases, others may necessitate orthodontic treatment and/or speech therapy.

What are some options for helping your child overcome the habit of sucking their thumb? 

-Treats, prizes, or distractions, such as a squeeze toy, are all examples of positive   reinforcement.

-Identifying and avoiding the triggers that cause the behavior to happen; one example is   stress.

-Gentle nudges to stop sucking one’s thumb

-Consultation with a dentist about a mouth guard or other dental device.

-Above all, avoid putting undue pressure on your youngster since this may be more   harmful than beneficial.

Conclusion:

When your child’s teeth first appear, wipe them with a damp washcloth every day to remove plaque. Use a soft child’s toothbrush and non-fluoride toothpaste until your child can spit out the toothpaste when their teeth grow. Use only a small pea-size amount of fluoride toothpaste on the toothbrush when your child is ready. Too much fluoride toothpaste in the mouth can discolor children’s teeth.

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